Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard: The People, Concerned

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The Courthouse

As the crowd of us left the courtroom, the fire alarm not shrill enough to shake up our slow file, I overheard the man in front of me comment: “The way things are going, this trial’s never going to end.” This wasn’t the only joking going on. As the case got started – it was October 16, the second day of the Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard trial – Judge Allison Burroughs reminded Harvard Dean of Admissions William R. Fitzsimmons that he would, in fact, still be under oath during the proceedings. It did not bode well when Judge Burroughs had to repeat the quip twice more for Fitzsimmons to understand.

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Distance

The following video is the first project I’ve put together for a course called “Immersive Storytelling Using Mixed Media.” The assignment was simple – take two videos with a cell phone, and play them at the same time.

I couldn’t keep it too simple, though. Our course professor had offered a few themes to run with, and the first to catch my eye was “long-distance relationship.” I’ve been working on one for over two years now, and no, it’s not impossible. I think it’s even become more common these days, and more doable. We’re lucky to be so connected.

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You Need Unique New York, You Know?

I have so many questions about how I will conduct myself in today’s United States. I have so many questions about how we converse to address hard hate. Ours is a country of multiplicity, and a country of unbridled spite. We march for personal freedoms, and we march for the Alt-Right. How can we cope with our divisions and our President’s revisions? Read on for thoughts on today’s US politics, and a photo gallery of a trip (at the end of the post) to NYC – a place I believe may hold some of the answers we seek.

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